Enhanced prefrontal-hippocampal spike-LFP coupling during learning of a spatial strategy (but not other strategies).

Negrón-Oyarzo, I., Espinosa, N., Aguilar, M., Fuenzalida, M., Aboitiz, F., & Fuentealba, P. (2018). Coordinated prefrontal–hippocampal activity and navigation strategy-related prefrontal firing during spatial memory formationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201720117.

A computational model of visual categorization in cortex that has properties similar to our lab’s results.  It must be true.

Abe, Y., Fujita, K., & Kashimori, Y. (2018). Visual and Category Representations Shaped by the Interaction Between Inferior Temporal and Prefrontal CorticesCognitive Computation, 1-16.

Big-ass survey of cortex by Gray and crew:

Dotson, N. M., Hoffman, S. J., Goodell, B., & Gray, C. M. (2018). Feature-Based Visual Short-Term Memory Is Widely Distributed and Hierarchically OrganizedNeuron.

Nice paper by Bressler and colleagues showing that top-down influences on visual cortex are mediated by beta-band oscillations.

Richter, C. G., Coppola, R., & Bressler, S. L. (2018). Top-down beta oscillatory signaling conveys behavioral context in early visual cortex. Scientific reports, 8(1), 6991.

Further reading on beta oscillations mediating top-down processing:
Buschman, T.J. and Miller, E.K. (2007) Top-down versus bottom-up control of attention in the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices. Science. 315: 1860-1862  View PDF »

Bastos, A.M., Loonis, R., Kornblith, S., Lundqvist, M., and Miller, E.K. (2018)  Laminar recordings in frontal cortex suggest distinct layers for maintenance and control of working memory.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  View PDF

 

Nice result from Buschman Lab.  Error-correcting dynamics introduce bias into working memory while reducing noise.

Error-correcting dynamics in visual working memory
Matthew F Panichello, Brian DePasquale, Jonathan W Pillow, Timothy Buschman
doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/319103

The Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT award Earl Miller the 2017 Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching.

 

Earl Miller offers advice on how to avoid multitasking in the May 2018 issue of Redbook.

Life and Family – Redbook May 2018

Press release for our new paper:
A heavy working memory load may sink brainwave ‘synch’

The paper:
Pinotsis, D.A., Buschman, T.J. and Miller, E.K. (2018) Working Memory Load Modulates Neuronal Coupling. Cerebral Cortex.  https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhy065  View PDF

Pinotsis, D.A., Buschman, T.J. and Miller, E.K. (2018) Working Memory Load Modulates Neuronal Coupling. Cerebral Cortex, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhy065

Abstract: There is a severe limitation in the number of items that can be held in working memory. However, the neurophysiological limits remain unknown. We asked whether the capacity limit might be explained by differences in neuronal coupling. We developed a theoretical model based on Predictive Coding and used it to analyze Cross Spectral Density data from the prefrontal cortex (PFC), frontal eye fields (FEF), and lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Monkeys performed a change detection task. The number of objects that had to be remembered (memory load) was varied (1–3 objects in the same visual hemifield). Changes in memory load changed the connectivity in the PFC–FEF–LIP network. Feedback (top-down) coupling broke down when the number of objects exceeded cognitive capacity. Thus, impaired behavioral performance coincided with a break-down of Prediction signals. This provides new insights into the neuronal underpinnings of cognitive capacity and how coupling in a distributed working memory network is affected by memory load.

Freedman and Ibos give us a new general framework to think about the functions of the parietal cortex.

Freedman, D. J., & Ibos, G. (2018). An Integrative Framework for Sensory, Motor, and Cognitive Functions of the Posterior Parietal CortexNeuron97(6), 1219-1234.